WAP with motorized propeller…

Nice improving of my automaton WAP by José Carpio: rotating propeller and fishes jumping in the sea.
Nice job, José 😉
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Landscape #1

Experimenting layering technique with various types of cardstock. Infinite shades can be obtained from high quality printing of white or colored cards.
A world to discover…
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Posted in 4. Paper Sculpture | Tagged , | 4 Comments

The Facebookuette Cube

Dear friends,
I think now more than ever it is important to practice our greatest attention and use extreme caution before joining, participating, discussing on various social, especially on facebook.
We not always have the necessary concentration for a prudent and reasoned approach, respectful of the truth of the facts and of the appropriate etiquette. Therefore, dear friends, inspired by the complex algorithm developed by Federico Cerioni and published in La Repubblica on August 31, 2016, I designed a simple tool that I hope will be of great help to all of you:
The Facebookuette Cube
This prodigious object, buildable just with scissors and glue, will become the faithful and discreet companion of your raids on fb. The use of The Facebookuette Cube is extremely intuitive and immediate.

Your comments will be henceforth punctual, accurate, documented!


Cari amici,
penso che mai come ora sia importante esercitare la nostra più grande attenzione ed adottare la massima prudenza prima di aderire, partecipare, discutere sui vari social, ed in particolare su facebook.
Non sempre abbiamo la concentrazione necessaria per un approccio cauto e ragionato, rispettoso della verità dei fatti e dell’appropriata etichetta. Per questo, cari amici, ispirato dal complesso algoritmo ideato da Federico Cerioni e pubblicato su La Repubblica il 31 agosto 2016, ho progettato un semplice strumento che spero sarà di grande aiuto a tutti voi:
The Facebookuette Cube
Questo prodigioso oggetto, costruibile semplicemente con forbici e colla, diventerà il compagno fedele e discreto delle nostre scorribande su fb. L’utilizzo de The Facebookuette Cube è estremamente intuitivo ed immediato.

I vostri commenti saranno d’ora in poi puntuali, precisi, documentati!

The Facebookuette Cube
😉 help me to produce new similar high social value objects 😉

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Posted in 2. Paper Models | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Looking for a Castle?

Do you need a castle to be 3D printed or, much better, to be printed on paper, cutout, and assembled? No matter how many towers, walls, crenellated ramparts you need: with Grand Castle Generator, you and your princess (or prince) will live in your magnificent castle happily ever after…

Here is how it works…

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Posted in 8. Other | 2 Comments

Game of Thrones Opening from 7,600 Moleskine Paper Pieces



Direction/Set Design/Animation/Post Production
DADOMANI Studio
Director of Photography: Patrizio Saccò
Graphics: Dadomani, Carlo Gazzi
Set Building: Dadomani, Linda Vallone
Music: Ramin Djawadi
Sound Fx: Dadomani
Client: Moleskine

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Posted in 1. Paper Automata, 2. Paper Models, 4. Paper Sculpture, 8. Other | 1 Comment

Rudolph

Rudolph paper model
Rudolph is waiting for you! 

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Posted in 2. Paper Models | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Coronelli’s Celestial paper Globe (Christmas Ornament version)

coronelli_portrait_2Vincenzo Coronelli (August 16, 1650 – December 9, 1718) was a Franciscan friar, cosmographer, cartographer, publisher, and encyclopedist known in particular for his atlases and globes. He spent most of his life in Venice. He produced celestial and terrestrial globes of different sizes and was one of the leading representatives of Italian globemaking art. His more noteworthy productions include the two entirely manuscript globes of about four meters in diameter built for Louis XIV (1638-1715), King of France. He drew many geographic maps published in atlases including the Atlante veneto (Venice, 1691) and the Isolario (1696-98). In about 1684, he founded the Accademia Cosmografica degli Argonauti in Venice. But Coronelli was not only a mapmaker. In fact, he took an interest in many areas of science. A fairly well known figure across Europe, he played a lively part in the scientific discussions over the astronomical discoveries of Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), and Isaac Newton (1642-1727). He was also a friend of eminent scientists of his day such as Edmond Halley (1656-1742) and Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1625-1712). [Museo Galileo – Institute and Museum of the History of Science, Florence (Italy)]

Coronelli paper globe

Coronelli was the first globe-maker to produce an atlas of globes. Such was his Libro dei Globi, first published in 1697. Within the covers of a book he provided a record of all the globes he had made, from the smallest, the 2-inch printed globes, to the largest, the 15-foot MS globes made in Paris and presented in 1583 to King Louis XIV of France. The Libro dei Globi thus combined the two cartographic art-forms in which Coronelli excelled, the atlas and the globe. [H. Wallis. Coronelli’s Libro dei Globi. British Museum, London, 1969]

In the present celestial paper globe, the gores for the 15-foot version were scanned at high resolution and reduced to form a 15 cm diameter globe. A blue background and a yellow color to the stars were added.

This celestial paper globe is part of the project “Remaking the Heavens“.

download Coronelli's Celestial Globe

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Posted in 2. Paper Models, 3. Paper Globes | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Cassini’s Celestial paper Globe on AstroMedia

I’m proud to announce that my project of Cassini’s Celestial paper Globe (Christmas Ball version) has just been published in a nice hard copy version by AstroMedia, specialized in cardboard kits of scientific instruments and models.

Cassini paper globe. AstroMedia

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Posted in 3. Paper Globes | Tagged | 2 Comments

“Remaking the Heavens” /2. Scan, prototype, and the North Pole

Almost two years already passed since I published my first (and last) post on “Remaking the Heavens”. Well, I worked on it, but not enough…

20160904_175110

The first thing I did was to scan the pages of the “Libro dei Globi”. That book contains several series of celestial (and terrestrial, too) gores for making globes of different size. I chose the series with maximum size, since it allows to reach optimum image resolution. Due to the size of the book (35×51 cm), and to ensure optimal results, I have committed the job to a professional firm (Be.One.Digital). Three types of images (.tiff) were produced: colored (as it is), grey scale, and b/n. The b/n version resulted the best in terms of definition and clearness, suitable for being colored. 

gores-compr
Then, I prepared the 3D model of the sphere (24 half-gores with 36 meridional segments). I decided to subdivide the sphere into 24 gores, instead of the classical 12 gores in order to improve the spherical shape of the globe. The assembling procedure will be longer, but the gores will be easier to handle.

Continue reading

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Posted in 3. Paper Globes | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Functioning ‘mechanical gears’ seen in nature for the first time

Previously believed to be only man-made, a natural example of a functioning gear mechanism has been discovered in a common insect – showing that evolution developed interlocking cogs long before we did.

See the research article by M. Burrows and G. Sutton in Science, and a report in the Research section of the University of Cambridge website

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